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2012 Excellence in Historic Preservation Award Recipients

project excellence
 

> Albany County Courthouse
Albany, Albany County
  

> Annex Mills at High Falls
Rochester, Monroe county

> Eastman Theatre
Rochester, Monroe county
  
> Amsterdam Armory
Amsterdam, Montgomery County
  
> Hamilton Grange National Memorial
manhattan, New York County
  
> Niagara Mohawk Building
Syracuse, onondaga County

  

> TWA Flight Center, JFK International Airport
Queens County

  

> Christ Church Bronxville
Westchester County

 

publication/Media
 

> Build a Better Burb

Nassau/Suffolk Counties

Organizational excellence

 

Steuben County

SPecial citation
 

> Organizers of the 2011 National Preservation Conference

Erie County


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> Albany County Courthouse
Albany, Albany County

 

 
     

  

Completed in 1916 to the design of Hoppin & Koen, this 6-story Classical design courthouse conveys a sense of “majesty in the law.”

Renovations and building systems upgrades have restored a degree of grandeur for staff and clients of the court system. Careful consideration of theoretical, aesthetic and practical issues make this a model project that sets a high standard for other practitioners.

Project design was led by Envision Architects PC of Albany NY, Principal-in-Charge Ted W. Mallin AIA and Project Associate Jay Stasack RA. Building Conservation Associates provided restoration consulting and the Plumb Excel Group PC provided Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. The Construction Manager was BBL Construction Services Inc. Other major contractors included: Eastern Building Restoration; T. Lemme Mechanical; and Titan Roofing; all of Albany; Evergreene Architectural Arts of New York City; DiGesare Mechanical Inc. of Schenectady; LaCorte Companies of Troy; C and K Carpentry of Delmar; Keicher Metal Arts of Leeds; and Dan Lepore and Sons Company of Conshohocken, PA.

The building is owned by Albany County and the tenant is the New York State Unified Court System 3rd Judicial District.

Design strategies for the renovation included the provision of all modern conveniences – including security, data and ADA compliance – with minimal changes to historic spaces. Cost, schedule and maintenance of the court calendar became significant factors as the project evolved. To minimize disruptions to judicial activities, construction was scheduled from 4:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.

According to Jay Stasack of Envision Architects, “The renovation of the Albany County Courthouse required a team dedicated not only to their individual tasks, but also to understanding the overall concept: that we were restoring a majestic place of Albany County’s history and future. ”

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> Annex Mills at High Falls
Rochester, Monroe county

 

 
        
This project transformed a group of Rochester’s most historic commercial buildings from vacant and hazardous condition into a showcase for affordable urban rental housing. By making use of state and federal low income and historic tax credit programs, and incorporating the NYS Homes & Community Renewal Green Building standards, the project stands as an example of incentives and best practices while bringing new life to this section of Rochester.

 

Contributing to the success of this project were the Urban League of Rochester Economic Development Corporation; Edgemere Development of Rochester; Barkstrom & LaCroix Architects of Rochester; Saralinda Hooker, Planning & Development Consultant of Canandaigua; and LECESSE Construction Services of West Henrietta.

The Teoronto Block was built in 1845-55, and is Rochester’s only surviving full block of a once-common building type, with three-story brick facades, stone trim, and continuous gabled roofs. Roof leaks had caused partial collapse of some sections of the roof and floor structures, and hazardous conditions including mold, asbestos and lead paint hampered design work and emergency repairs.

According to William G. Clark, President and CEO of the Urban League of Rochester, Inc., “I am extremely proud of the work that our team has accomplished. I would like to thank Carolyn Vitale, Vice President and COO of the ULREDC, and her staff, our development team, the City of Rochester, The State of New York, Eastman Kodak Company, supporting elected officials, KeyBank and our investor Key Community Development Corporation for their vision in undertaking such an enormous task, and preserving and converting these pre-Civil War buildings into quality affordable housing.”

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> The Eastman Theatre
Rochester, Monroe county

 

 
        

This historic theatre has been beautifully transformed into a 2,250 seat orchestral hall which now complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and boasts other amenities through the addition of a new East Wing. The architects and the University of Rochester took great pains to deliver greater utility while respecting the facility’s historic, architectural and cultural significance.

Primary contributors to the success of the project were Chaintreuil Jensen Stark Architects, LLP; The Eastman School of Music / University of Rochester; the Pike Company, and A’Kustics. Primary financial supporters included the State of New York through the efforts of Assemblymen Joseph Morelle and David Gantt, the Eastman Kodak Company, the Wolk Foundation, Wegmans, and many generous individual donors.

The Eastman Theatre opened in 1922 for silent movies with live musical accompaniment. Designed by McKim Mead and White with the Rochester firm Gordon and Kaelber, it is the only large movie palace remaining in the city of Rochester today. While major motion pictures have not been screened there in some time, the theatre continues to be a valuable community resource.

“The University of Rochester’s vision to link new academic facilities at the Eastman School of Music’s urban campus to a renewed commitment and stewardship of the historic Eastman Theatre provided the design team with a unique opportunity to contribute to a Landmark, enhancing historic preservation, the arts, academia, and the public realm in New York State,” said Craig Jensen, AIA, partner in Chaintreuil Jensen Stark Architects, LLP. “Rarely does a project require so much of so many individuals, and also reward us in so many ways.”

“The newly renovated Eastman Theatre and new addition enhance Eastman’s role as one of the nation’s premier music schools,” said Jamal Rossi, Executive Associate Dean of the Eastman School of Music. “For the city of Rochester, this project reinforces the University of Rochester’s commitment to the words that are engraved on the Theatre’s façade:  ‘For the Enrichment of Community Life.’ ” 

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> Amsterdam Armory
Amsterdam, Montgomery County

 

 
        

The Phemisters’ purchase of this property in 2005 signaled a turnaround not only for the building but for the surrounding community.

Their contributions to Amsterdam’s South Side are illustrated in the letters of support their project garnered from Representative Paul Tonko, Mayor Ann Thane, The Historic Amsterdam League and the Historian of the City of Amsterdam.

Contributing to the success of this project were Susan and Manfred Phemister, owners; Thomas MacGregor, Designer, of Brooklyn; Congressman Paul Tonko; and the Hon. Ann Thane, Mayor of Amsterdam.

One of 26 armories designed by Isaac Perry, the Amsterdam Armory was built in 1894 and decommissioned in 1994. In addition to being the only New York armory privately owned as a residence, it also serves visitors as the “Amsterdam Castle” bed and breakfast.

According to Susan Phemister, “Restoring this amazing building to code and active use was a huge effort, but it is so exciting to see the surrounding community revitalize with us.  By using energy-efficiency and green building techniques we were able to save thousands on heating while establishing an upscale tourist destination.”

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> Hamilton Grange National Memorial
manhattan, New York County

 

 
     

  

This project ably demonstrates the methodical approach that John G. Waite Associates, Architects takes to preservation and restoration. From the completion of a multi-volume HSR – including both a structural and furnishings plan – to the dramatic engineering feat of moving a two-centuries-old house – the firm provided both the vision and technical expertise to carry out a complex and daunting project.

Contributing to the success of this project were John G. Waite Associates, Architects; Plus Group Consulting Engineering; Robert Silman Associates; Skidmore Owings & Merrrill LLP, EDAW; and Available Light; all of New York, and Mactec Engineering (now Amec) of Portland, Maine.

Hamilton Grange, built as the country estate of Alexander Hamilton and completed in 1802, was designed by John McComb, who would later design New York’s City Hall. Reopened in 2011 after a five-year restoration and a move across the street to St. Nicholas Park, National Park rangers now give tours and host special programs illuminating Hamilton’s life and contribution to the birth of the nation. Visitors are also encouraged to linger in the landscaped gardens surrounding the home.

According to John G. Waite FAIA of John G. Waite Associates Architects PLLC, “This was a very interesting project for our firm. John G. Waite Associates, Architects is pleased to have directed the relocation and restoration of Hamilton Grange, New York’s only home of a founding father. The project presented serious and complex technical challenges, which were only overcome through the cooperation of our team made up of experienced private sector design professionals, building move contractors, skilled restoration craftsmen working with dedicated National Park Service preservation specialists. With stunningly restored and newly furnished interiors, the Grange has been warmly embraced by the Harlem community.” 

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> Niagara Mohawk Building
Syracuse, onondaga County

 

 
        

The Niagara Mohawk Building is an unparalleled example of commercial Art Deco architecture, and is iconic at the local, regional and national levels. As is so often the case, however, years of deferred maintenance, inappropriate alterations and poor workmanship had taken their toll. The building envelope restoration has returned this “Cathedral of Light” to its former grandeur, and is an outstanding example of

twentieth-century materials conservation, repair and restoration.

Contributing to the success of this project were Klepper Hahn & Hyatt, of East Syracuse; Crawford & Stearns; LeChase Construction; and Josall Roofing; all of Syracuse; Raymond E. Kelley, Masonry Contractor, Bowmansville; Ajay Glass Co., Canandaigua; and building owner National Grid.

    

The NiMo Building was constructed in 1931-32 to the design of two prominent architectural firms of the day, Melvin L. King of Syracuse and Bley and Lyman of Buffalo. It is notable for its innovative design and massing, inventive use of materials such as cast stone, terra cotta, aluminum cladding, Vitrolite black glass, neon/helium exterior lighting, and its overall futuristic appearance.

According to Rich Applebaum of Klepper Hahn & Hyatt, “The exterior envelope restoration of this significant Art Deco building was realized through the concerns and interests of the owner, the expertise of the design team, and the reliability and workmanship of the contractors. As a team, we were all dedicated to restoring and preserving this beautiful landmark in a manner that respected the original materials and elements.”

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> TWA Flight Center, JFK International Airport
Queens County

   
        

The TWA Flight Center, designed by Eero Saarinen, was an icon of modern architecture when it opened in 1962. By 2002, the building was no longer in use and had to be mothballed to prevent additional deterioration. From the glass curtain wall to the ‘penny tiles’ – period finishes have been restored and the building is once again a significant part of JFK Airport.

Contributing to the success of this project were The Port Authority of NY & NJ, Aviation Department; Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners LLP; Joseph R. Loring & Associates, Mechanical / Electrical / Plumbing Engineer; Gordon H. Smith Corporation; Robert Silman Associates; Susan Brady Lighting Design; Pentagram, Graphic Designer - Interior; all of New York; and Beys Specialty, Inc., General Contractor, of Brooklyn.

The TWA Terminal was an experiment in aviation technology, incorporating the first use of jetways and baggage carousels. Unfortunately, the changing airline industry quickly outpaced the unique Saarinen design. During the 1990s, TWA was unable to maintain this finely-detailed building, and in 2002, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey undertook a program to stabilize the building for future adaptive reuse.

According to Richard Southwick FAIA of Beyer Blinder Belle, “The work of the highly skilled designers and craftsmen in restoring the tile and stone finishes, the sunken seating area and the curtain wall, coupled with the sensitive integration of 21st century life safety systems completes the critical first step in the revitalization of the TWA Terminal. We are thrilled to have it available to the public once again.”

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> Christ Church Bronxville
Westchester County

 

 
        

At Christ Church, the restoration plan wisely included a global view of environmental stewardship, from stormwater management to reducing energy use. The awards jury agreed that by reinstating the natural climate control features of traditional building methodologies – in other words, windows that open – the project team has set a fine example for other practitioners.

Contributing to the success of this project were the clergy, staff and faith community of Christ Church Bronxville; Walter Sedovic Architects;Altieri Sebor Wieber Engineers; Edward Stanley Engineers; Chandler LLC Owners Representative; Herbert Rose Inc.; Brenner Builders; Guy’s Electric; Rohlf’s Stained & Leaded Glass; Landmark Slate & Cooper; Robert M Spano Plumbing; McDevitt Metal; and Ellen Mired Glass.

Designed by Bronxville architect Bertram G. Goodhue and completed in 1926, the church’s physical plant has been readied for the 21st century while the building’s history and core architectural features were treated with respect.

According to Walter Sedovic of Walter Sedovic Architects, “This award is especially significant to us because it is an affirmation of an approach to our heritage buildings that says, ‘let’s slow down and first understand what the original design intention was, and how well the building actually functions…and only then begin to consider interventions.’  The success of this project reinforces how remarkably responsive historic buildings are to modern energy concerns, and that traditional buildings should serve as models of sustainability and energy conservation.”

Arthur G. Taylor, Chairman of the Facilities Committee of Christ Church Bronxville that oversaw the project, stated that “the first priority in making the repairs and improvements was to ensure that we respected the historical significance of the church building and its original design features. We are confident that we have achieved that goal, and this award validates our decisions.”

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> Build a Better Burb

Nassau/Suffolk Counties

 

 
        

An offshoot of the Long Island Index, this website asks ordinary people to imagine more vibrant and sustainable communities on Long Island. We hope that the site can serve as a model for other communities around the state and nation, and are pleased to honor the exemplary work of the Rauch Foundation and the Long Island Index.

Contributing to the success of this project were Nancy Douzinas, President, Rauch Foundation; Ann Golob, Director, Long Island Index, Rauch Foundation; Jocelyn Wenk, AICP, Associate Director, Long Island Index, Rauch Foundation.

The website offers advice on how to preserve streetscapes and re-use historic buildings to provide new types of housing, from both a local and regional perspective. Key areas explored on the site include housing, transit, regional planning and sense of place. It encourages and facilitates the incorporation of historic preservation into the broader discussion of reshaping Long Island’s built environment.

“Long Island will only be a region that creates a home for future generations and a reinvigorated economy if we are willing to be bold – to try what we haven't tried before and most importantly, to learn from our past,” said Nancy Rauch Douzinas, president of the Rauch Foundation and publisher of the Long Island Index which created the Build a Better Burb website.  “Doing what we have been doing in the recent past will not work. Yet we have these historic downtowns from which to learn. These village centers have defined our architectural styles and in the past they were the place to provide exactly the kind of housing that we need today for our young people and to create more economically diverse communities. Many other regions are adapting, trying new ideas, building differently. We have so much to learn just by understanding what has worked here in our not so distant past.”

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> Corning Enterprises

Steuben County

 

 
     

  

The scope of this group’s achievements is particularly poignant this year, as they were a key supporter of ongoing efforts to recover from devastating flooding resulting from Hurricane Agnes in 1972.

Corning Enterprises led pioneering efforts to promote downtown living, especially in upper floors over commercial spaces. Now, four decades later, Market Street is an often-used example of how upper floors can provide desirable living spaces and contribute to thriving and lively downtowns.

Contributing to the success of Corning Enterprises’ efforts were The City of Corning; Johnson-Schmidt & Associates Architects; Market Street Restoration Agency; The Gaffer District; Three Rivers Development; all of Corning; the Empire State Development Corporation; and a number of building owners. Project costs have been supported by Restore New York; the New York Main Street program; and New York State Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits.

Corning Enterprises, the community development agency for Corning Incorporated, joined the effort to revitalize downtown Corning in the early 1980s. The development and rehabilitation of upper floors on Market Street as market rate apartments continues to be a top priority for Corning Enterprises. This initiative has had a marked impact on the quality of life, economy, and long-term preservation of Market Street’s historic built environment.

“Corning Enterprises’ commitment to continue upper story renovation projects has had a profound impact on the vitality of downtown Corning through the creation of new businesses to support the residents, and has significantly affected the vibrancy of Market Street to create a new kind of downtown liveliness that hadn’t existed in many decades,” said G. Thomas Tranter, President, Corning Enterprises. “As a national model for downtowns created by Market Street’s revitalization early on, Market Street has once again become a model for revitalizing its commercial district.”

According to Elise Johnson-Schmidt, Architect, “Corning Enterprises efforts to champion the vitality of Market Street through rehabilitation has resulted in a downtown that is more vibrant and exciting than ever, and continues the legacy of Market Street as a national leader in the preservation and revitalization of Main Street America.”

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> Organizers of the 2011 National Preservation Conference

Erie County

   
     

 

No activity to date in Western New York, and perhaps anywhere, has been such a catalyst for advancing and defining the importance of historic preservation for a city and a region than the National Preservation Conference held in Buffalo in October, 2011.

The League was delighted to play a role in this transformative event,
and asks you to join us in celebrating the success of the organizers of this historic event: Catherine Schweitzer; Preservation Buffalo Niagara and its executive director at the time, Henry McCartney; Visit Buffalo Niagara (VBN) and Bob Skerker.